A Selfless Act Earned Him $400K — Now This Homeless Man Is Giving It Away

Giving Tuesday may have passed, but one homeless man is embracing his new role as a philanthropist after an inspiring act earned him hundreds of thousands of donated dollars.

Johnny Bobbitt, Jr., a former paramedic experiencing homelessness in Philadelphia, came to the aid of Kate McClure when her car ran out of gas on a strip of highway. Bobbitt walked two miles to the nearest gas station, used his last $20 to buy gas and delivered the fuel to McClure.

Instead of simply paying Bobbitt back, McClure shared the story and established a GoFundMe page that quickly went viral. Less than three weeks later, the fund has raised nearly $400,000 from 14,000 individuals inspired by the Good Samaritan act.

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This NFL Star is Tackling Period Stigma — And Helping Homeless Women

As an offensive lineman for the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers, Joshua Garnett excels in one of the most macho cultures in the US, but he’s using his platform to tackle an issue long treated as too gross or too uncomfortable for men to talk about — periods and menstrual hygiene.

Garnett has teamed up with his sister Rachel’s organization Kitty Packs to help homeless women who experience “free bleeding,” which is what happens when a woman is unable to access expensive sanitary pads or tampons to manage her period.

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Newark arrival

We pulled into Penn Station and rushed off the train.

On the ivory tile, we noticed a stain.

A man on the floor like a spill or a smudge,

Which we all stepped around – the man didn't budge.

The manager knocked on the maintenance door,

And told them ‘Go clean up the mess on the floor.’

The janitors sick of such mopping and sweeping

Propped up a sign that said Caution: Man Sleeping. 

An abandoned campsite near my apartment

I went down to the subway at about 6:30 this morning and came across the remains of a campsite just outside the turnstile. 

I rarely ride the train so early and, in four years, I have never encountered an intimate scene like this at my local station. A new box of toothpaste sits in a plastic basket. There's a 2L bottle of Coke – with a few sips left –  and a package of disposable razors in a cardboard box on top of a bathrobe. The not-quite-empty bowl of soup and the frozen, half-eaten banana seem to suggest that the squatter left in a hurry. What made them leave?

I wonder if they'll come back for their stuff.